Webinars, Webinars…

On24 runs a wonderful series of webinars on… how to run webinars. The insight is very useful and typically comes from companies, which are advanced webinar users (and religiously measure the success of their efforts).

How Ericsson is Growing Global Engagement Through Digital Events

  • Ericsson runs over 150 webinars a year; the number of webinars grows about 25% every year
  • Every campaign has a webinar component
  • Ericsson has webinar series specifically for analysts
  • Every physical event has a digital component
    • Challenge is packaging the event materials to be easily digested online
    • Many customers who attend physical events share video recording with colleagues (easiest way to share)
    • Physical events can be also used to prepare a “package” for a certain customer (ABM)
  • Video gets more engagement (no video needed if it is “just me talking,” the video is used when a piece of equipment, etc. could be demonstrated.
    • Ericsson partnered with a video production company
  • Webinars released just on-demand get slightly less attendance; attendees typically would like to ask questions
  • ABM: production webinars dedicated to specific accounts
    • Plan to expend this practice to additional accounts
    • 80% educational, 20% sales
    • Typically producing the webinar together with the customer
      • The customer sends invitations
      • Only employees of the target company can attend
    • This type of webinars get the most engagement
  • The best option for increased engagement: have 2 people to present as a dialog. This approach is less formal and usually preferred by the audience
  • Recommendation to experiment constantly around webinar content and delivery

Lessons from 1,000 webinars – Informa

Informa runs over 1,000 webinars a year in a very organized program (outgrew Excel as a program management tool).

  • 6 – 8 weeks cycle
  • Webinar registrations:
    • Majority of webinar registrants are coming from email
    • On24 promotes registration for the next webinar during the live event
    • On24 successfully tried LinkedIn for webinar registrations (less than $40 per registrant)
  • Case studies are a popular content type (strong registration)
  • Informa is seeing growth in a discussion-based webinars
  • Polls tip: if you can do a poll, where the audience will most likely answer a question in a certain way, and later in your presentation, you could show that this approach is wrong, it is a very powerful tool
  • Twitting during the live webinar brings additional registrants
  • Pre-recorded webinar:
    • polling is not possible
    • but a good option for multiple presenters with busy schedules
  • Webinar engagement correlates with a higher lead acceptance by sales (On24 data)

Expanding webinar program globally – Invidia

  • Nail down your process before global expansion
    • centralized calendar
    • process with clear timelines
    • central location with support materials
    • Templetize… everything!
    • Perfect the process and then share with regions
  • Regional events might require an additional week of preparation (translations, etc.)
  • Train one regional group at a time, and move to the next group when the first one is comfortable
  • Internal newsletter “Webinar Wednesday” – bi-weekly communication sent to the group of people interested in webinars in addition to Slack channel update
    • webinar best practices
    • tool changes
    • program update

How SFDC uses webinars

  • Why webinars are successful:
    • People are more comfortable providing their information in exchange for attending a webinar (information is valuable and they are accustomed to “register” for events)
    • Sales are more likely to follow up on webinar leads than some other type of leads (webinar attendees spent time listening to the company’s content)
  • SFDC uses a Webinar Brief, which is required 5-6 weeks in advance but promotes webinars only about 15 days in advance
  • Master webinar calendar is shared through the entire organization
  • Speakers are encouraged to promote webinars to their contacts
  • Sales are encouraged to promote webinars (marketing and sales promotional emails are used)

Book – This is Marketing

seth.pngSeth Godin summarizes many known (and loved) marketing concepts in his new book.  It is difficult to say which one of his books is my favorite, and a couple of books might be needed to make sure a new idea is firmly planted in my understanding.

The latest illustration of frequency concept is very vivid: don’t change your ads when you are tired of them, don’t change your ads when your coworkers are tired of them, don’t change your ads when your friends are tired of them, change your ads when your accountant is tired of them.

The most interesting (and new for me) idea in the book is Minimum Viable Market or a minimum viable audience. As Minimum Viable Product is a well-known concept, Minimum Viable Market should probably be considered at the same time.

Stake out the smallest market you can imagine. The smallest market that can sustain you, the smallest market you can adequately serve. This goes against everything you learned in capitalism school, but in fact, it’s the simplest way to matter.

When you have your eyes firmly focused on the minimum viable audience, you will double down on all the changes you seek to make. Your quality, your story and your impact will all get better.

And then, ironically enough, the word will spread.